Cogmed in Denver

Cogmed is coming

Archive for the tag “Attention”

Psychology Today Article: Working Memory Training as an Alternative to Medication for ADHD

Keep It in Mind

Understanding and improving your working memory.

ADHD and Medication: What’s New?

To medicate or not? Research in children with ADHD.

Scientific American on Alternative Therapies for ADHD


Training the Brain

Cognitive therapy as an alternative to ADHD drugs

To medicate or not? Millions of parents must decide when their child is diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)–a decision made tougher by controversy. Studies increasingly show that while medication may calm a child’s behavior, it does not improve grades, peer relationships or defiant behavior over the long term.

Consequently, researchers have focused attention on the disorder’s neurobiology. Recent studies support the notion that many children with ADHD have cognitive deficits, specifically in working memory–the ability to hold in mind information that guides behavior. The cognitive problem manifests behaviorally as inattention and contributes to poor academic performance. Such research not only questions the value of medicating ADHD children, it also is redefining the disorder and leading to more meaningful treatment that includes cognitive training.

“This is really a shift in our understanding of this disorder from behavioral to biological,” states Rosemary Tannock, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Tannock has shown that although stimulant medication improves working memory, the effect is small, she says, “suggesting that medication isn’t going to be sufficient.” So she and others, such as Susan Gathercole of the University of Durham in England, now work with schools to introduce teaching methods that train working memory. In fact, working-memory deficits may underlie several disabilities, not just ADHD, highlighting the heterogeneity of the disorder.

“Working memory is a bottleneck for everyday functioning independent of what category you fit into,” comments Torkel Klingberg, a neuroscientist at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Based on Klingberg’s research, Karolinska founded Cogmed–a biotech company that has developed a software program to train working memory. In a recent paper in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Klingberg reported that 60 percent of 20 unmedicated ADHD children no longer met the clinical criteria for ADHD after five weeks of training. The company has already rolled out its training service in Sweden and Germany, and Karolinska is collaborating with New York University to launch a clinical trial with ADHD kids later this year.

“It’s intriguing data,” Tannock remarks. “The emphasis is on visual-spatial memory, which is where we find the strongest link to inattention and ADHD. But they have to go further. You want to show that training improves ability on a range of tasks, not just holding information.”

That ADHD children would respond to cognitive training does not surprise experts such as Lawrence H. Diller, a child psychiatrist and author of Running on Ritalin. “Hyperactivity and inattention are bell-shaped spectrum disorders,” he says. “The majority of kids who are getting medication are borderline normal versus abnormal.” In Diller’s experience, the former benefit the most from nonpharmaceutical training approaches. Medication has been overemphasized by a pharmaceutical and medical industry “that has changed people’s view of themselves,” he continues. “Personal responsibility has taken a backseat to lifelong disorders.”

Moreover, because there is no industry to back it, behavioral therapy has been grossly underrated, Diller and others opine. Unpublished data from the Multimodal Treatment Study–the largest U.S. long-term study of ADHD treatment in children–show that after two years, kids treated with behavioral therapy only (parent training, school intervention and a special summer camp program) functioned just as well as kids on high-dose medication, says lead researcher William Pelham of the University at Buffalo. Also, only an additional 8 percent of the children in the behavioral arm were medicated at the end of the second year, indicating that most parents in this group were satisfied with behavioral therapy.

Cognitive ability may decrease at higher levels of ADHD medication. Is this another reason to consider working memory training as an alternative?

http://www.news.wisc.edu/

Study pinpoints effects of different doses of an ADHD drug; finds higher doses may harm learning

March 8, 2012

New research with monkeys sheds light on how the drug methylphenidate may affect learning and memory in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

The results parallel a 1977 finding that a low dose of the drug boosted cognitive performance of children with ADHD, but a higher dose that reduced their hyperactivity also impaired their performance on a memory test.

“Many people were intrigued by that result, but their attempts to repeat the study did not yield clear-cut results,” says Luis Populin, an associate professor of neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-MadisonSchool of Medicine and Public Health.

Populin was senior author of the new study exploring the same topic, now available in the early access section of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, published last week. In the study, three monkeys were taught to focus on a central dot on a screen, while a “target” dot flashed nearby. The monkeys were taught that they could earn a sip of water by waiting until the central dot switched off, and then looking at the location of the now-vanished target dot.

The system tests working (short-term) memory, impulsiveness and willingness to stick with the task, as the monkeys could quit “working” at any time, says Populin. The study used different doses of methylphenidate — the generic name for Ritalin — that were comparable to the range of clinical prescriptions for ADHD.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, almost 5 percent of American children are taking medications for ADHD.

Read more…

Additude article about Cogmed

Programmed for Success?

The training consists of eight simple, memory-tuning exercises. The software prompts you, for instance, to listen to a string of numbers and recite them backwards, or to watch sections of a grid light up in sequence, and then copy the pattern. It’s not exactly scintillating stuff, but over time, I found myself enjoying and getting better at the drills. I suspect my son shared this experience. The program provides graphs that chart your progress, and both of us watched our lines go steadily upward. Tuckman kept telling my son how much better he was doing than I was — another powerful motivator for him.

The obvious question for consumers is how this proficiency translates into real-world skills. Cogmed representatives say 80 percent of those who complete the training experience “significant change.” I looked for signs of improvement, both in Buzz and me, and didn’t see anything dramatic. At the start of Week 3, I forgot my purse when I went out to dinner. On the other hand, after only a couple of weeks, it seemed that my son was making more eye contact, and having fewer and less intense temper tantrums. Amid one of our most difficult summers ever, full of cabin fever and conflict, we had some unusually calm conversations. Furthermore, after Buzz hacked into my Facebook account, sending goofy messages to my friends — alas, not unusual behavior for him — he apologized, which wasn’t exactly on par with teaching himself Farsi, but, for him, was extraordinary.

Results Over Time

Tuckman tells me that the changes often take time to appear — sometimes several months after the training is completed — so I’m staying hopeful.

Meanwhile, I’m pondering two questions: 1) Might it be that anything else that was going on in our lives this summer — from family therapy to the fact that my son was out of school for a couple of months—helped improve his behavior? This is something only a controlled study could tell us, and I had only my anecdotal experience. 2) What role did our expectations play in the improvements we saw?

LA great deal of research has been done on the placebo effect, all of it suggesting that expectations matter mightily. It’s also a no-brainer that when a parent directs intense, positive attention toward a child — from closely monitoring his diet to schlepping her to violin lessons — it’s bound to have a positive effect.

Might it be that my son was being perceptibly nicer because I’d been sending him my own “You Rock!” signals every time he completed a day of Cogmed training? I’ll probably never know, but I am convinced it didn’t hurt.


This article appears in the Winter 2011 issue of ADDitude.
SUBSCRIBE TODAY to ensure you don’t miss a single issue.


page   1   2

Cogmed: Some satisfied, and some unsatisfied users

http://www.greatschools.org/special-education/community/discussion.gs?content=53307

Complaints that Cogmed providers and coaches are not disclosing that they make a profit from recommending this treatment are relevant and important!  Hopefully, there are few professionals out there who would gouge their customers/patients or prey on them due to their troubles. Be a good consumer!!  Always shop around (whether it is for a new shirt, medical or psychological treatment, or a new pair of shoes) and remember that prices are not set in stone.  The providers are determining cost based on the market, and it never hurts to ask for a discount or reduced price.  The worst that can happen is that they’ll say “no.”

Used at Universities…

From the NC State website:

A. Cogmed Working Memory Training is a home-based program that helps children and adults with attention problems by training and increasing their working memory capacity, thus resulting in improved ability to follow directions, compete tasks, refrain from becoming distracted, and in general, function more independently. Clinically proven results demonstrate that after training, children improve their ability to concentrate, control impulsive behavior and better utilize complex reasoning skills. In the end, better academic performance can be achieved especially in math and reading.

It is a comprehensive, home-based program. Through active engaging exercises, children (and adults) train at home five days a week for five weeks. An office visit is not necessary. The software automatically increases in difficulty, improving attention abilities. Every participant has a personal coach who leads the training, analyzes results, and provide encouragement through weekly phone calls. Two versions are available, one for children and adolescents, and one for adults. A preschool version is also available.

Q. What is working memory?

A. Working memory is a function of the brain that helps to temporarily store and manage the information required to carry out complex competitive tasks such as learning, reasoning, and comprehension. Working memory keeps information in the mind for a short time, typically for a few seconds, in order to use that information for thinking. In daily life, we use working memory for a number of tasks such as remembering instructions, solving problems, controlling impulses, and focusing attention. These are the activities that typically plague individuals with attention deficits.

Q. What are the signs of weak working memory?

  • Problems focusing
  • Distractibility
  • Difficulties starting and finishing tasks
  • Forgetting instructions

Q. What are the benefits of training working memory?

  • Improved ability to sustain attention
  • Improves impulse control
  • Better complex reasoning skills
  • Better academic performance
  • Parents and teachers also report other benefits in daily life:
    • improved social skills
    • taking initiative
    • remembering things
    • completing tasks like homework assignments more independently
  • When asked one year after training to report on their experience, 79% of parents whose children had benefited from training reported effects had remained or increased.

Q. What does research show?

Research has established an important connection between working memory, attention, and school work. Most children with an attention problem also have working memory deficit. That means they don’t have the same working memory capacity as their peers. Increasing working memory capacity improves attention which helps improve academic performance.

Published, peer-reviewed, and controlled clinical studies have demonstrated that, upon completion of Cogmed Working Memory Training, 80% of participants have significantly improved their ability to concentrate and use complex reasoning skills over the long term. Cogmed Working Memory Training is scientifically validated by placebo-controlled clinical studies published in respected professional journals, and there is an on-going research at several leading U.S. universities. New research suggests positive results for normally-aging adults as well.

Q. How can I get more information?

Post Navigation